The other day, I was thinking, the gas grill needs to be brought out from winter’s hibernation and the propane tank filled so it is ready for dad’s arrival from Florida. For three months a year, he enjoys grilling, especially those juicy burgers he makes by hand.

I have the perfect Father’s Day gift for him, “The Ultimate Burger: Plus DIY Condiments, Sides, and Boozy Milkshakes,” by America’s Test Kitchen (2019, America’s Test Kitchen, $26.99).

In the “Anatomy of an Ultimate Burger,” it says, “no one element makes a burger ultimate, it’s the result of a combination of flavors and textures coming together.”

In this section, buns, sauce, toppings, cheese and the patty are discussed. I found the Dos and Don’ts of Store-Bought Ground Beef helpful. “Go Beyond Beef” introduces other burger options.

For those who want to really want to get into the “meat” of it, “Be Your Own Butcher” gives the knowledge in choosing the right cuts to create your signature blend and how to grind your meat without intimidation.

“Get Ready to Cook” ensures that every burger you make is tender and flavorful.

The book’s recipes don’t stop with burgers. Included are recipes for all of the trimmings; sauces, fries, potato and macaroni salads, buns, and milkshakes.

From the recipes here to pretzel buns, beer-battered onion rings, buttermilk cole slaw and ultimate cookies and Irish cream milkshakes to grilled Portobello burgers with goat cheese and arugula, and Connecticut steamed cheeseburgers (the latter two can be found at bit.ly/2VTJGpt, America’s Test Kitchen’s “The Ultimate Burger” will make your barbecues varied and delicious.

If you look around, burgers are everywhere. You can find local, regional and national restaurants dedicated to burgers. Some think of the hamburger as the “cuisine” of the country. Chefs have come up with creative signature craft burgers, plant-based patties and home cooks are getting into grinding their own meat.

As many know, the hamburger has roots in New Haven. Louis’ Lunch claims to be the inventor of the hamburger. Today, they are still cooked in the original vertical broilers as they were in 1900. And remember, no ketchup allowed!

The headnote says, “Why This Recipe Works: Ground turkey is a great neutral canvas, making it an ideal choice as the base for a burger with lots of mix-ins. We wanted super flavorful turkey burgers that take full advantage of this fact, but first we had to start by addressing the problems that plague ground turkey. Despite their popularity, turkey burgers are notorious for being bland and/or dry. This is because turkey has a mild flavor, and its leanness means it can easily dry out during cooking. We wanted to reinstate the turkey burger’s good reputation with an easy way to crank up the flavor and add some much needed moisture. We boosted the flavor of our patties by stirring some melted butter and feta cheese into the ground meat; these simple additions provided plenty of richness and flavor while preventing the burgers from drying out. For textural interest, we added fresh baby spinach to the meat mixture. Chopped dill lent a hit of freshness, and minced garlic rounded out the flavors. Be sure to use 93 percent lean ground turkey, not 99 percent fat-free ground turkey breast, or the burgers will be tough.”

Break ground turkey into small pieces in large bowl. Add spinach, feta, melted butter, dill, garlic, and pepper and gently knead with hands until well combined. Divide turkey mixture into 4 equal portions, then gently shape each portion into 3/4-inch-thick patty. Using your fingertips, press center of each patty down until about 1/2-inch thick, creating slight divot.

For a charcoal grill:Open bottom vent completely. Light large chimney starter filled with charcoal briquettes (6 quarts). When top coals are partially covered with ash, pour evenly over grill. Set cooking grate in place, cover, and open lid vent completely. Heat grill until hot, about 5 minutes.

For a gas grill: Turn all burners to high, cover, and heat grill until hot, about 15 minutes. Turn all burners to medium.

Clean and oil cooking grate. Season patties with salt. Place patties on grill, divot side up, and cook (covered if using gas) until well browned on first side and meat easily releases from grill, 4 to 6 minutes. Flip patties and continue to cook until browned on second side and meat registers 160 degrees, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer burgers to platter and let rest for 5 minutes. Serve burgers on buns. Serves 4

Grilled turkey burgers with miso and ginger: Omit spinach, feta, salt, and pepper. Whisk 2 tablespoons miso paste and 1 tablespoon water together in bowl until combined. Add miso mixture to turkey with melted butter. Substitute 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger for dill and 2 minced scallions for garlic.

Grilled turkey burgers with herbs and goat cheese: Omit spinach and garlic. Substitute 3/4 cup crumbled goat cheese for feta. Add 1 large minced shallot and 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley to turkey with melted butter.

The headnote says, “Why This Recipe Works: Creamy potato salad may be the classic, but we wanted a modern, summery option that could cook on the grill from start to finish right alongside some of our delectably charred burgers. For smoky potatoes with tender insides and crispy, grilled outsides, we started with halved, unpeeled red potatoes. Leaving the skins on helped the potatoes stay intact, as their firm, waxy texture stood up to the heat of the grill. Crumbled bacon was an obvious choice to add smokiness, and we found that we could infuse our salad with even more savory bacon flavor by reserving some of the fat and coating the potatoes with it before grilling. Grilling our onions with the potatoes gave them a beautiful char that heightened their flavor. Instead of a thick dressing that would hide the spectacular grill marks on our potatoes, we opted for a bold vinaigrette with a kick of chipotle to add even more smoky depth. Halving our potatoes after they cooled exposed their creamy center and allowed them to soak up the spicy, tangy flavors of the dressing. Use small red potatoes 11/2-2 inches in diameter. If you don’t have 2 tablespoons of fat in the skillet after frying the bacon, add olive oil to make up the difference.”

Cook bacon in 12-inch skillet over medium heat until crisp, 7 to 9 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer bacon to paper towel-lined plate. When cool enough to handle, crumble bacon and set aside. Reserve 2 tablespoons bacon fat. (If necessary, add olive oil to equal 2 tablespoons.) Whisk vinegar, mayonnaise, chipotle, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and pepper together in large bowl. Slowly whisk in oil until combined; set aside.

For a charcoal grill: Open bottom vent completely. Light large chimney starter three-quarters filled with charcoal briquettes (41/2 quarts). When top coals are partially covered with ash, pour evenly over grill. Set cooking grate in place, cover, and open lid vent completely. Heat grill until hot, about 5 minutes.

For a gas grill: Turn all burners to high, cover, and heat grill until hot, about 15 minutes. Turn all burners to medium.

Clean and oil cooking grate. Toss potatoes with reserved bacon fat and remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt in bowl. Push toothpick horizontally through each onion round to keep rings intact while grilling. Brush onion rounds lightly with oil and season with salt and pepper. Place potatoes, cut side down, and onion rounds on grill and cook, covered, until charred on first side, 10 to 14 minutes.

Flip potatoes and onion rounds and continue to cook, covered, until well browned all over and potatoes are tender, 10 to 16 minutes. Transfer potatoes and onion rounds to rimmed baking sheet and let cool slightly.

When cool enough to handle, halve potatoes. Remove toothpicks and coarsely chop onion rounds.

Add potatoes, onion, scallions, and bacon to dressing and toss to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve warm or at room temperature. Serves 4-6

The headnote says, “Why This Recipe Works: Smoky, salty bacon can take any burger to the next level, but burgers with just a few strips on top failed to deliver bold bacon flavor. Our version nixes the strips and mixes bacon directly into the burger for bacony bliss in every bite. Mixing raw bacon with raw ground beef overworked and compressed the patties so that they cooked up tough and dry, and cooked crumbled bacon — though it mixed in better — was too crunchy. For the perfect balance of bacon flavor and juicy texture, we processed raw bacon in the food processor and then cooked it briefly in a skillet. The par cooked pieces incorporated easily into the ground beef and dispersed bacon flavor more evenly throughout while the burgers stayed moist and juicy. Instead of tossing the leftover bacon fat we used it to sauté some onions, which provided salty balance to their sweet flavor. To turn these burgers into a savory showstopper, we topped them with rich and creamy crumbled blue cheese.”

Process bacon in food processor to smooth paste, about 1 minute, scraping down sides of bowl as needed. Cook bacon in 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat, breaking up pieces with wooden spoon, until lightly browned in spots but still pink (do not cook until crisp), about 5 minutes. Drain bacon in fine-mesh strainer set over bowl. Transfer bacon to paper towel-lined plate and let cool completely. Reserve bacon fat.

Add 2 tablespoons reserved fat to now-empty skillet and heat over medium heat until shimmering. Add onion and salt and cook until well browned, about 20 minutes. Transfer to bowl and set aside.

Break ground beef into small pieces and spread into even layer on rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle with bacon and gently toss to combine using 2 forks. Divide beef mixture into 4 equal portions, then gently shape each portion into 3/4-inch-thick patty. Using your fingertips, press center of each patty down until about 1/2-inch thick, creating slight divot.

For a charcoal grill: Open bottom vent completely. Light large chimney starter filled with charcoal briquettes (6 quarts). When top coals are partially covered with ash, pour evenly over grill. Set cooking grate in place, cover, and open lid vent completely. Heat grill until hot, about 5 minutes.

For a gas grill: Turn all burners to high, cover, and heat grill until hot, about 15 minutes. Leave all burners on high.

Clean and oil cooking grate. Season patties with pepper. Place patties on grill, divot side up, and cook until well browned on first side, 2 to 4 minutes. Flip patties, top with blue cheese, if using, and continue to cook until well browned on second side and meat registers 120 to 125 degrees (for medium-rare) or 130 to 135 degrees (for medium), 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer burgers to platter and let rest for 5 minutes. Serve burgers on buns, topped with onions. Serves 4.

New Haven Food Truck Festival: June 1, noon to 7 p.m., New Haven’s Long Wharf waterfront. Free Admission; food and beverage are an additional cost. More info at streetfoodnhv.com/festival.

Consiglio’s Brunch Demonstration Cooking Class: June 1, 11 a.m., Consiglio’s Restaurant, 165 Wooster St., New Haven, 203-865-4489 (reservations required), $75 (beverages, tax and gratuity not included), bit.ly/2Nd0xAg.

Sun BBQFest: June 1 (11 a.m.-10 p.m.) and June 2 (11 a.m.-5 p.m.), Mohegan Sun, 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd., Uncasville. $5 per days, $8 for two-day ticket. Children under 6 free. Schedule of events and info at bit.ly/2nECs8D.

Chefs of Our Kitchen (C.O.O.K.) Series: Francesco d’Amuri, chef and owner, and his wife, Allison De Renzi, of L’Orcio in New Haven. June 5, 6 p.m., Gateway Community College, 20 Church St., New Haven, 203-285-2617, $65 includes pre-event reception and three-course dinner featuring classic Italian dishes from their restaurant, with wine pairings. Tickets and information at gatewayfdn.org/cook-tickets.

Connecticut Media Group