Many of you know I am a collector of vintage recipes, hand-written recipe cards and cookbooks. It has been quite a while since I shared some recipes from a vintage pamphlet in the collection. “7-Up Goes to A Party! Recipes for Barbecues, Guest Dinners, Open Houses Holiday Events,” published in 1962 by the Seven-Up Co. has interesting recipes, all with the beverage as an ingredient.

You might have cooked with beer or wine, but probably not with soda. Booklets like this one were used by food companies as a way to market their products since advertising as we know it today didn’t exist. Companies offered recipes featuring their products in these types of publications which most often were distributed for free. The illustrations and photos in vintage recipe pamphlets often may be humorous to us today.

In researching cooking with soda, I found many recipes: cola burgers, ginger ale baked ham, Mountain Dew steak kebabs, lemon-lime soda pound cake, root beer baked beans, club soda waffles and chocolate cola cake with cola frosting. You might be familiar with beer can chicken, with the chicken standing upright on an open can of beer while it cooks — you can replace the can of beer with a can of root beer or other soda.

I was curious to learn about the beginnings of 7Up. Actually, the original name was Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime soda created by Charles Grigg in 1929. You might be thinking: did it contain lithium? It did contain lithium citrate until 1948. The name was shortened to “7 Up Lithiated Lemon Soda,” and in 1936, to 7Up. There are many theories as to how the name came about, but nothing conclusive. Is it the seven original ingredients; the number of letters in Seven Up; or perhaps because it was originally sold in 7-ounce bottles? One theory is that the “Up” comes from the mood-lifting effect of lithium, at one time an ingredient.

The beverage has gone through several ownerships over the years and now part is of the Keuring Dr. Pepper group of beverages. Like many products, the beverage has had several slogans and taglines including; “7Up, You like it, It Likes You,” Fresh up with 7Up,” “Nothing Does it like 7Up,” and probably the most memorable, “The UnCola.”

Whether you drink it straight up, as a cocktail mixer, or as an ingredient in savory or dessert dishes, the lemon-lime flavor beverage has you covered.

Check out these recipes from the pamphlet.

Mix softened cream cheese with pineapple. Stir in 7Up. In another bowl, put in peaches and grapes and then sprinkle sugar over the fruit and toss. Stir fruit mixture into the cream cheese/pineapple mixture. Pour into a 2-quart container, cover and place in freezer until partially thickened. Whip the cream until stiff and fold cream and marshmallows into fruit mixture. Freeze until solid. Makes 8-10 servings.

Note: When making this recipe, I used a silicone loaf pan. The mixture fit perfectly and the loaf was very easy to remove when fully frozen and slice.

Combine seasonings with oil and stir in 7Up. Pour into a shallow baking pan or casserole dish.

Place chicken in marinade in the baking dish or casserole and turn once, allowing each side to marinate for a half-hour. Drain chicken thoroughly on paper towel, reserving marinade. (Discard garlic pieces.) Dredge chicken in flour, then slowly brown it in butter in a skillet. Return chicken to marinade. Bake at 325 degrees for 45 minutes or until tender. Keep baking dish uncovered and baste chicken with marinade a few times during baking. Remove chicken to a warm platter.

For sauce, pour remaining marinade from casserole dish into a skillet in which chicken was browned. Heat through and thicken with a little flour and water paste. Stir in milk and continue cooking, stirring constantly, until thickened. Pour sauce over chicken. Makes 6 servings.

Sift flour, baking powder and salt into a bowl. Cut in shortening with two knives or a pastry blender until mixture resembles coarse cornmeal. Add 7Up all at once. Stir briskly with a fork only until dry ingredients are evenly moistened. Turn onto a lightly floured surface. Knead quickly 8-10 times. Roll to 3/4-inch thickness. Allow to rest for a few minutes. Cut with lightly floured two-inch cutter. Arrange on a greased baking sheet, brush lightly with melted butter. Bake in a preheated 450 degree oven 10 to 12 minutes until golden brown. Makes 12 two-inch biscuits.

In a casserole dish, stir beans with all ingredients except mushrooms. Bale in a preheated 350 degree oven for 1 hour. Stir in mushrooms and continue baking for 10 minutes. Makes 8 servings.

Simmer 1 quart of apple juice with cinnamon sticks and cloves for 10 minutes. Refrigerate several hours or overnight to develop spice flavors. Discard cinnamon sticks and cloves. Combine mixture with remaining apple juice and the orange juice in a chilled punch bowl. Slowly pour in 7Up. Add ice cubes, and garnish with apple slices. Makes 3 quarts.

Mix brown sugar, cinnamon, cloves and orange rind. Stir in 7Up. Spoon over ham during the last 30 minutes of baking time, using about a third of the mixture every ten minutes. Makes 2 cups, enough for a 6- to 10-pound ham.

The pamphlet also has these quick tips using the beverage:

Freeze 7Up in ice cube trays. Use the tangy ice cubes to spark party drinks.

To make an easy smoked pork butt glaze, mix 7 ounces of 7Up and 1/2 cup of maple syrup.

Baste broiled fish dishes for a tangy citrus flavor.

For a chocolate sauce, melt 3 squares of baking chocolate with a cup of sugar and 7 ounces of 7Up.

Evenly browned pie crusts are easy when you use 7Up as the liquid in your favorite pastry recipe.

Fresh fruit has more zip when 7Up is poured over the chilled fruit (apples, peaches, pears and berries) just before serving.

The 7Up website provides many recipes, too, such as like this one:

Cut avocados in half, remove the pit and scoop out the middle into a medium bowl. Add 7Up and lime juice, and mash with a fork until it reaches your desired consistency. Add in pico de gallo and gently stir to combine.

Season with cumin, salt, and pepper, to taste. Serve immediately.

Odyssey Express, Sept. 5-6, Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox Church, 480 Racebrook Road, Orange. The 40th year of the Odyssey festival is different due to the ongoing pandemic — the festival is canceled but the popular food will still be available. All food to be preordered for curbside pickup from noon-8 p.m.; menu and online ordering at https://odysseyexpress.org.

New Haven Restaurant weeks, Sept. 13-26. More than two-dozen of downtown New Haven’s award-winning and internationally diverse restaurants are featuring $19 lunch and $36 dinner fixed price menus along with $60 to-go options. Participating restaurants and details at https://bit.ly/2FY38uS.

BASTA Trattoria, 1006 Chapel St., New Haven, 203-772-1715, Pasta Trio, menu at bit.ly/2WPnmwy, choose three different pastas and three different sauces for $20 per person. Served for lunch (noon- 3 p.m.) Saturdays and Sundays for dining indoor or outdoor. bastatrattoria.com

Geronimo Tequila Bar and Southwest Grill, 271 Crown St. New Haven, 203-777-7700, happy hour from noon to 4 p.m., with $1 sliders, $1 drafts and $2 cans and bottles. These specials are available for dine-in only (indoor or outdoor). bit.ly/2ZW5cek

Shell and Bones, 100 S. Water St., New Haven, 203-787-3466, re-introduces happy hour, Monday through Thursday from noon to 4 p.m, offering $1 oysters, half-price bottles of wine and $1 drafts. Specials available for dine-in only (indoor or outdoor). shellandbones.com

Worth Tasting, culinary walking tour of downtown New Haven, Sept. 12, 10:30 a.m., reservations required, 203-415-3519, $68. Enjoy tasty samplings from several of New Haven’s favorites.Tickets at bit.ly/2FjiwMP.

Connecticut Media Group