A few months ago, in the thick of the pandemic, West Hartford’s housing market really started heating up, as city dwellers in our region began searching for suburban alternatives to living in their apartments with no backyard, amid densely populated environments. Interestingly, Orthodox Jews…

Hearst Connecticut Media Editorial Board predicts “reckoning if domestic violence is not recognized as part of the challenge in trying to heal from the pandemic.”

Connecticut’s bear population, estimated at 800, is growing “exponentially,” a newspaper reported the other day. This was a bit hyperbolic, since after 800 the next level in an exponential series is 800 times 800 — 640,000 — and the bear population will not be increasing that quickly.

Other states that match Connecticut’s proposed new standards have brownfields problems of their own, for a simple reason — if developers don’t see an economic payoff in a property, they aren’t going to invest in its rehabilitation

The question becomes what legislators are willing to do to reform the system. Connecticut has some of the highest electric rates in the nation, and though its system is generally reliable, it has repeatedly proven vulnerable to major storms.

The New York Times, the old grey lady of eastern seaboard journalism, has published a blockbuster story, “Your Coronavirus Test Is Positive. Maybe It Shouldn’t Be,” that should be widely reported in other media formats. So far, the substance of the story has remained pretty much on the media shelf.

Maybe someday when the United States has a president who is not crazy or senile, a Senate president who isn’t his tool, and a House speaker who doesn’t think that those who disagree with her are “enemies of the state,” the country can have a serious discussion about fixing the U.S. Postal Service.

The coronavirus pandemic has not been tamed, even as Connecticut has seen low infection rates and decreasing hospitalizations in recent months. It’s not just the players at risk, but everyone they might come in contact with, including parents and grandparents.

College students can rightfully feel like they’re being cheated. It’s only a brief time in their lives they get to experience anything like campus life, and this is a year unlike any other. But for everyone’s benefit, including their own, they need to show some common sense and respect for b…

Along with many others, COVID-19 has had a devastating impact on the Hall Football program. Due to the situation, we’ve had to cancel our annual golf tournament, which consists of over 90% of our fundraising revenue. In addition, the town recently prohibited us from displaying supporter sign…

With so much attention being paid to social distancing inside the schools, it makes little sense to then send students out into close contact with others on the football field, or any other sporting venue. The risks are still too great.

The uncertainty surrounding school openings — and the quality of education that can be provided in safe, social distancing settings — are a source of great concern to parents, students and teachers. And while all area schools are doing their best to fashion suitable learning environments, is…

The school year is fast approaching, but there remains time to help out students in need and get them prepared for what has to be considered a likely scenario where some form of distance learning is required

Hard as he tries, Gov. Ned Lamont can’t guarantee safety to anyone as he undertakes to get Connecticut operating normally again with the virus epidemic diminishing. Largely because of the governor’s use of emergency powers, Connecticut is doing far better than other states, but some people a…